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Ayurveda Herbs Spices Possible Side Effects When to Avoid

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You know the long history of herbs and spices as medicinal plants in Ayurveda. But they too can have side effects if contradicted with other medicines or conditions. Ayurveda herbs spices.

Herbs and spices are routinely used in Ayurveda as medicines, as beauty products, cooking and traditions. It is always best to purchase organic as fresh as possible (or grow your own). Moreover, be sure they come from a reliable source.

Consuming these in teas is usually the easiest and most relaxing way to get your Ayurveda dosage. Plus, they can be healthier alternatives versus that caffeinated black tea or coffee (still love my coffee). Most importantly, consider how and if you can use it and what possible side effects could occur.

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15 Ayurveda Herbs and Spices

Aloe Vera

The gel from the aloe vera leaf is harvested. This is then used topically on burns and wounds to promote healing. And I love my aloe vera products and plant.

 

How to use it:

Gel is collected from the inner leaf and can be applied directly to skin.

 

Possible side effects:

As some people take this orally for digestion, it can cause an irregular heartbeat or kidney issues. Further, it can also lower blood sugar levels.

 

Who shouldn’t use:

This is when taken orally, if you are diabetic, have heart conditions or kidney problems you shouldn’t use this herb.

Arnica

The oil from this plant has been used to ease pain from bruising, swelling and aches. So, it is included in many of these products.

 

Possible side effects:

Eating the herb can increase blood pressure. Likewise, cause your heart to race and shortness of breath.

 

Who shouldn’t use:

Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding should not drink this tea.

Cinnamon

Cinnamon is harvested by cutting the stems off the cinnamon tree and removing the inner bark. This herb is anti-inflammatory as well as a great source of antioxidants. It supports the lowering of blood sugar and curbs cravings. Moreover, it has been discovered to lower cholesterol.

 

Some varieties can be a bit spicy. And it has been used because of this in toothpastes to prevent bad breath.

 

How to use it:

Cinnamon is readily available and can be found at any supermarket. But when I want really fresh herbs or for a special purpose, I go to Penzey’s spices. In conclusion, you can use it in warm beverages, sprinkled on fruits and cereal or in your baking.

 

Possible side effect:

You can overdo your cinnamon. Especially, with cassia cinnamons because it includes the compound coumarin that could possibly cause liver damage, mouth sores and breathing problems. So, it’s best to keep it at 1 teaspoon per day.

 

Who shouldn’t use:

Avoid consuming cinnamon with prescriptions for diabetes, heart disease and liver disease due to it can worsen their side effects.

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Cumin

Cumin is a common spice. It is derived by crushing the seeds of the Cuminum Cyminum plant. In short, it is native to regions of the Mediterranean and Southwest Asia.

 

Studies show cumin can aid healthy digestion and assist to improve blood sugar control and cholesterol.

 

Possible side effects:

It is rare but consuming high amounts can cause fertility difficulties in men. To sum up, in women it could induce pregnancy loss.

 

Who shouldn’t use:

If you take diabetes medications cumin could cause blood sugar levels to go down too much.

Fenugreek

Fenugreek is an herb that comes from the Mediterranean region, Southern Europe and Western Asia. The seeds have a long history in Ayurveda. Its seeds have been used to fight against skin conditions and encourage breast milk production. In addition, it assists inflammation.

 

How to use it:

It is best to lightly crush the seeds and mix with warm water. This you can than drink as a tea. Further, you can use it to season various dishes.

 

Possible side effects:

When consumed in large quantities fenugreek can lead to potential:

  • Diarrhea
  • Stomach issues
  • Bloating
  • Gas
  • Dizziness
  • Headaches

 

Who shouldn’t use:

Pregnant women should avoid fenugreek. And if you have an allergy to chickpeas, you could be allergic to fenugreek as well.

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Garlic

Garlic is widely used in cooking and is easy to find. It helps lower high blood pressure and cholesterol.

 

Possible side effects:

Garlic can thin your blood and risk bleeding.

 

Who shouldn’t use:

You should avoid using if you take blood thinners.

Ginger

Ginger is taken to ease nausea due to pregnancy, surgery, chemotherapy or motion sickness. It can be purchased in a crystalized cube to chew.

 

Possible side effects:

  • Blood clotting
  • Heart rhythms
  • Blood pressure
  • Blood sugar levels

 

Who shouldn’t use:

You shouldn’t use if taking any blood thinners or you have diabetes.

Ginseng

Ginseng can be taken as a tea and has been used to help lower blood sugar.

 

Possible side effects:

  • Insomnia
  • Nausea
  • Migraine headaches
  • High blood pressure

 

Who shouldn’t use:

Ginseng can interact with anti-diabetic medication and blood thinners. Avoid if pregnant.

Goldenseal

Goldenseal is used for constipation, colds, and eye infections.

 

Possible side effects:

  • Heart rhythms
  • Blood clotting
  • Lowers blood pressure

 

Who shouldn’t use:

Don’t use goldenseal if you have a blood clotting condition or are taking blood pressure medications.

Gymnema Sylvestre (aka Gymnema Leaf)

In Ayurveda the gymnema sylvestre leaves are used as medicine to aid sugar cravings and lower blood sugar levels. The leaves are also used to help with weight loss and decrease inflammation. In addition, there have been clinical trials researching GS as a diabetes medicine because of its hypoglycemic qualities.

 

How to use it:

You can purchase GS as a supplement capsule or use the dried leaves in a tea. The leaves should be boiled for 5 minutes and then you can have it sit for 10 to 15 minutes before drinking.

 

Possible side effects:

  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Lightheadedness
  • Shaking
  • Dizzy

 

This could happen when you mix GS with other herbs or medicines that are used to lower blood sugar levels. Most importantly, it can cause your blood sugar to go down too much.

 

Who shouldn’t use:

You are taking aspirin, St. John’s wort or have an allergy to milkweed.

Holy Basil (Tulsi)

Holy basil provides many potential medicinal benefits for mental and physical conditions. In conclusion, holy basil properties have been studied to assist depression and anxiety.

 

How to use it:

It can be consumed in food and as a supplement. However, its leaves, flowers or even dried leaf powder can be taken as tea.

 

Possible side effects:

Tulsi is usually soothing, but some can find it makes them wired, stressed or very jittery after consuming. Thus, take note of your reaction.

 

Who shouldn’t use:

If you are pregnant, lactating or trying to become pregnant you should avoid holy basil.

Kava

Kava is great for anxiety and insomnia.

 

Possible side effects:

Liver damage (hepatitis) interacts with alcohol and other drugs that cause drowsiness.

 

Who shouldn’t use:

Those who have liver or kidney issues should avoid kava.

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Licorice Root

Eucerine uses this herb in their Redness Relief products. Therefore, it supports skin health.

 

How to use:

Licorice root can be consumed in many forms including a liquid extract, powder tea, and DGL. This is licorice with glycyrrhizin taken out to prevent stomach problems.

 

Possible side effects:

According to studies too much licorice root can cause:

  • Muscle weakness
  • Fluid retention
  • Metabolism abnormalities
  • Raise blood pressure
  • Sweating
  • Heartbeat irregularity

 

Who shouldn’t use:

Because of these potential side effects if you have high blood pressure, kidney disease or heart disease please steer clear. In addition, avoid if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.

 

Triphala

Triphala is an Ayurveda formula that can be purchased through Banyan Botanical as a supplement. It is made with three fruits native to India: Amalaki, Bibhitaki and Haritaki.

 

As its primary purpose it aids with digestion issues. The herbal concoction has also been mentioned in the GUT HEALTH PROTOCOL by John G. Herron. To sum up, Triphala is an antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antibacterial.

 

How to use:

It is always more effective to consume herbs in a tea.

 

Possible side effects:

This herb can have some side effects like:

  • Stomach issues
  • Cramps
  • Diarrhea

However, you should lower the dosage and see how this works.

 

Who shouldn’t use:

Triphala can interact negatively with diabetes and high blood pressure medication.

Turmeric

Turmeric is considered the golden spice in Ayurveda. Curcumin is its main property. That is to say, it can help reduce inflammation.

 

How to use:

I combine it with other herbs in my Summer Blend and then sprinkle this on foods I eat. But you can use in a tea.

 

Possible side effects:

There may be some mild stomach issues such as:

  • Nausea
  • Diarrhea
  • Dizziness

 

Who shouldn’t use:

If you have gallstones, gallbladder disease or a bile duct obstruction you should avoid turmeric.

Wrapping it up

Only a few herbs and spices are listed here. These can be added to your daily diet giving you that extra boost with improving your health and well-being.

An allergy to any substance can develop at any time. There may be contradictions with current medications. Herbs and spices have no exceptions. Most importantly, do your research and check with your doctor before incorporating them into your routine.

Mary

Mary is the founder of All About Our Skin. Former esthetician and CPC. Enjoys researching skincare and has been studying our skin for the past fifteen years.

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